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Key Documents

Study on Staff Training

The effects of staff training on staff confidence and challenging behavior in services for people with autism spectrum disorders

Full Report on Staff training in studio3 approaches a peer reviewed study..

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As the last resort: reducing the use of restrictive physical interventions using organisational approaches

Roy Deveau (University of Kent) and Andrew McDonnell (Studio 3)

Accessible summary
  • People living in a home should not be restrained unless they are really hurting themselves or somebody else.
  • People living in a home should be helped to manage their own behaviour without being restrained.
Summary

The development of restrictive physical interventions (RPI) to manage challenging behaviours based upon control and restraint during the 1980s and 1990s led to widespread professional disquiet and campaigning to improve the policies, training and application of physical techniques. This included the promotion of a value base within which physical techniques should be used. This value base may be summarised as any use of physical interventions must be in the person’s best interests, ‘least restrictive’ and used as the last resort following preventive strategies. The last resort principle implies that services should be able to demonstrate support plans to prevent or reduce the frequency and/or restrictiveness of PI used in individual cases. This paper proposes that adopting explicit policies and practice to reduce restrictive PI is likely to be more effective in improving quality of support as opposed to solely managing PI use. Discussion of current policy and practice is followed by discussion of organisations’ roles in relation to RPI reduction, with international comparisons.

As the last resort: reducing the use of restrictive physical interventions using organisational approaches

Studio 3 Research

Applied research has driven the work of Studio 3 Practitioners from the very beginning.  Evidenced based practice is the cornerstone of our work. Over the last 20 years we have developed our training courses, by evaluating its impact and feedback?  So good science means interpreting such evidence. The famous economist John Maynard Keynes once said “When my information changes, I alter my conclusions. What do you do, sir?”

It is our hope that evaluating the real impact of staff training can encourage a more scientific approach.  The lack of evidence in the field is truly alarming (McDonnell 2011). In addition,  introducing concepts that are well known in other fields to a new area can lead to the notion that “old wine in a new pot” can also be useful.  The Atlass programme applies knowledge gained in the field of stress management to services that support people with autism. This has led to a change in thinking to our mantra “manage the underlying stress rather than behaviours per se.

We will actively encourage applied research as it helps us to develop our programmes.

Staff training in physical interventions

Training staff in physical interventions is a global billion dollar industry. Despite the widespread teaching of such methods in all care sectors the research is very inadequate. We at Studio 3 are world leaders in research in this field – the following literature review contains published studies that include training staff in physical interventions.

An earlier version of this review was originally completed by Dr Andrew McDonnell as part of his PhD thesis at the University of Birmingham in 2005. Since this time the review has been updated – it is our wish to make this information freely available

This PDf document will be reviewed annually.

Download/View Pdf Download a pdf of this presentation

The effectiveness of low arousal approaches

We are the originators of this term. Low arousal approaches are used worldwide and have a great deal of popularity. However, despite being conceptually strong there is a scarcity of hard data. this article provides a clear conceptual framework for the approach.

Dr Roy Deveau, Tizard Centre, University of Kent is currently evaluating low arousal approaches. initially, he is establishing the reliability and 
validity of a staff measure of low arousal approaches.

(Written piece to be added by  Roy Deveau, Tizard Centre, University of Kent)

Link to low arousal site

Autism and stress

We have developed a stress management approach
called Atlass autism. This focuses on stress management as a primary
intervention for people with autism.

The programme is the subject of evaluation in Denmark by researchers at the University of Aalborg.

Link to Atlass autism

Applied research has driven the work of Studio 3 Practitioners from the very beginning.  Evidenced based practice is the cornerstone of our work. Over the last 20 years we have developed our training courses, by evaluating its impact and feedback?  So good science means interpreting such evidence. The famous economist John Maynard Keynes once said “When my information changes, I alter my conclusions. What do you do, sir?”

It is our hope that evaluating the real impact of staff training can encourage a more scientific approach.  The lack of evidence in the field is truly alarming (McDonnell 2011). In addition,  introducing concepts that are well known in other fields to a new area can lead to the notion that “old wine in a new pot” can also be useful.  The Atlass programme applies knowledge gained in the field of stress management to services that support people with autism. This has led to a change in thinking to our mantra “manage the underlying stress rather than behaviours per se.

We will actively encourage applied research as it helps us to develop our programmes.

Staff training in physical interventions

Training staff in physical interventions is a global billion dollar industry. Despite the widespread teaching of such methods in all care sectors the research is very inadequate. We at Studio 3 are world leaders in research in this field – the following literature review contains published studies that include training staff in physical interventions.

An earlier version of this review was originally completed by Dr Andrew McDonnell as part of his PhD thesis at the University of Birmingham in 2005. Since this time the review has been updated – it is our wish to make this information freely available

This PDf document will be reviewed annually.

Download/View Pdf Download a pdf of this presentation

The effectiveness of low arousal approaches

We are the originators of this term. Low arousal approaches are used worldwide and have a great deal of popularity. However, despite being conceptually strong there is a scarcity of hard data. this article provides a clear conceptual framework for the approach.

Dr Roy Deveau, Tizard Centre, University of Kent is currently evaluating low arousal approaches. initially, he is establishing the reliability and 
validity of a staff measure of low arousal approaches.

(Written piece to be added by  Roy Deveau, Tizard Centre, University of Kent)

Link to low arousal site

Autism and stress

We have developed a stress management approach
called Atlass autism. This focuses on stress management as a primary
intervention for people with autism.

The programme is the subject of evaluation in Denmark by researchers at the University of Aalborg.

Link to Atlass autism